Human- and Cyber-infrastructures to Study and Combat Violence

Human- and Cyber-infrastructures to Study and Combat Violence

From religious violence in the Late Roman Empire to the persecution of Jews, Muslims, lepers, and prostitutes in the Middle Ages, to the state-sponsored violence of conquest in the fifteenth century Atlantic world, through lynching in the nineteenth century American South and into contemporary domestic abuse and gang violence, men and women of all races, nationalities, income levels, and geographic spaces have been touched by violence. The sheer numbers of incidences of violence historically are staggering and the complexity and sheer number of variables that interlock the social, cultural, economic, and political issues underlying violence prove daunting when considered across temporal and geographic spaces. Because of this, the study of violence has fragmented along disciplinary lines and become the domain of specific scholarly subfields. Historians of the American South and African-American studies concentrate on lynching; scholars working on religious persecution in antiquity usually consider their own incidences of violence; contemporary policymakers rarely consult humanities scholars to integrate their understandings into policymaking. The Human- and Cyber-Infrastructures to Study and Combat Violence (HCSCV) Group hopes to bridge these disciplinary divides by viewing the study of violence as a systemic and structural force that is simultaneously historical and contemporary. In doing so, HCSCV serves as an important point of collaboration through which individuals and communities analyzing, theorizing, and grappling with instances of violence can leverage advanced information technologies, education, and community-based resources to speak to one another across disciplinary and scholarly lines. HCSCV, with aid from SEASR andI-CHASS, will assess the applicability and adaptation of existing high performance computing technologies. HCSCV and SEASR/ICHASS are working with the Southern Poverty Law Center, the History of Peace and Violence Committee, the cities of Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York, California State University, Los Angeles (CSULA)Queens College, New York, and the Teacher Education for the Advancement of a Multicultural Society (TEAMS).